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Phoropter

If, during an eye examination, your doctor has discovered a vision problem like nearsightedness, farsightedness or astigmatism, it’s likely that one of the next steps you’ll take will involve a phoropter. A phoropter is special machine used to switch multiple lenses in front of your eyes to correct your vision.

Phoropters look imposing—like space-age visors—but are really an ingenious way to quickly determine the exact vision correction needed by your individual eyes.

By having you look through the phoropter at a visual reference, image, or the “Big E” chart (the Snellen chart), your eye doctor will help guide you toward lenses that correct your vision impairment by switching lenses within the machine on the fly.

How does a phoropter work?

The process of switching lenses in front of your eyes is less involved than it may look, given the imposing nature of the device. A phoropter is used to manually determine “refraction”—exactly how a lens must be shaped and curved to correct your vision to a normal state, nothing more.

Phoropters are subjective however, based on your visual perception and response to your eye doctor’s questions. Is your vision better, or worse? With this lens, or this lens? How about now?

There are other procedures and technologies available that automatically measure the refraction needed within your eye and produce a “prescription” measurement without your input. These are called autorefractors and aberrometers.

 

Special thanks to the EyeGlass Guide, for informational material that aided in the creation of this website. Visit the EyeGlass Guide today!

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As of September 1, OHIP-covered patients will lose access to eye care. This means kids 19 and under, adults 65 and over, as well as diabetics cannot be seen by their optometrist because the government will not step up.

Optometrists in Ontario are redirecting all OHIP patients to their family doctor, their ophthalmologist (if they have one), or the ER if it is an emergency. ⁣⁣At this time, we are still booking non-OHIP patients which includes people 20-64 years old. ⁣⁣We are hoping for a fast resolution from this job action, and we would appreciate your help by visiting www.saveeyecare.ca !!

All you have to do is fill in your name and postal code and it will generate a letter to your MPP. The more letters the government receives, the faster we can hope for this to end! #saveeyecare